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SIGHTING TECHNOLOGY IN MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICAN ART

Organized by MARÍA FERNÁNDEZ

Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, 

History of Art and Visual Studies, Cornell University

MAY 13-14, 2011

A.D. WHITE HOUSE

The history and criticism of Latin American art for the most part exclude or obscure works in which contemporary technologies play an integral part. This omission reinforces the assumption that experimentation and innovation in technological art are exclusive provinces of the developed world. The involvement of Latin American artists with various media technologies dates at least to the late nineteenth century and has especially flourished in the last three decades. As the history of art expands to include diverse fields of media arts and visual culture, the recognition of these practices is not only overdue but also urgent to the development of both art history and global understandings of modernity.

Overview

This conference will contribute to this underdeveloped area of historical and critical studies and to comparative histories of modernity by reflecting on current and historical works. The participants will address questions such as: How does the inclusion of technologically engaged images and practices in the history of Latin American art challenge our understanding of this art? Are there regional specificities to the use and understanding of media technologies? Are contemporary media technologies relevant to the representation of national identities? Has the dissemination of digital technologies contributed to preserve cultural memory? To what extent do technologically engaged practices contribute to indigenous social movements and aesthetics? To what extent do contemporary media artists invoke the indigenous and colonial past in their work? Is Latin American digital art indifferent to social realities? Are existing theories of globalization and comparative modernities adequate to understand this work? Can artists’ engagements with technology stimulate the development of new historical and critical discourses about Latin American art? These questions are intended to stimulate not to foreclose the discussions. Diverse disciplinary and methodological approaches will be included.

 

María Fernández received her Ph.D. in Art History from Columbia University in 1993. Her research interests include the history and theory of digital art, postcolonial studies, Latin American art and architecture and the intersections of these fields. She has published essays in multiple journals, including Art Journal, Third Text, nparadoxa, Architectural Design, Fuse and Mute. Her work appears in A Companion of Contemporary Art Since 1945, edited by Amelia Jones (Blackwell 2006), and At a Distance: Precursors to Art and Activism on the Internet, edited by Annmarie Chandler and Norie Neumark (MIT Press, 2005). With Faith Wilding and Michelle Wright she edited the anthology Domain Errors: Cyberfeminist Practices (Autonomedia, 2002). Fernández has recently completed Cosmopolitanism in Mexican Visual Culture (University of Texas Press, forthcoming), and is working on a book on the British cybernetician Gordon Pask, focusing on his contributions to theater, art and architecture and investigating parallels among his theories, artificial life and materialist philosophy.

Participants

KEYNOTE ADDRESS:

RAFAEL LOZANO-HEMMER (Artist, Mexico) 

"Platforms for Alien Participation."

FEATURED SPEAKER:

RUBÉN GALLO (Director, Program in Latin American Studies; Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Cultures, Princeton University), “Notes Towards an Acoustic Modernity: Radio and Avant-Garde Practices in Mexico City.” 

CONFERENCE PARTICIPANTS:

RODRIGO ALONSO (Art historian, Universidad de Buenos Aires; Curator representing Argentina at 2011 Venice Bienniale), “Emancipating Realities: Art and Technology in Argentina around the Sixties.” 

 

KARLA JASSO (Art historian, Chief Curator at Laboratorio Arte Alameda, Mexico), “Cybernetics and Electronic Sculptures in Mexico: Two References for Contemporary Techno-Artistic Practices.” 

 

LYNDA KLICH (Visiting Assistant Professor, Hunter College, CUNY), “Estridentismo, Mexican Modernity, and the Popular.” 

 

JOSÉ-CARLOS MARIÁTEGUI (Scientist and media theorist/researcher/curator, UK, Peru), “How Media Art Becomes Social: A New Technological Culture in Latin America.” 

 

SIMONE OSTHOFF (Associate Professor, Critical Studies, School of Visual Arts, Pennsylvania State University), “Beyond Syntax: Intersections of Poetry, Art, Design and Media in Brazil in the Late 1950s.” 

DANIEL R. QUILES (Assistant Professor, Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago), “From Communication to Containment: Space and Technology in Argentine Art, 1966-1974.” 

MARTHA SESÍN (Independent scholar, US), “Technology and Toys: Optical and Kinetic Art's Rise and Fall in Mid-Twentieth Century Paris.” 

Schedule

Friday May 13, 2011

3:30 PM: OPENING REMARKS:

Salah M. Hassan (Director, Institute for Comparative Modernities; Goldwin Smith Professor, Africana Studies, History of Art and Visual Studies) and María Fernández (Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies, History of Art and Visual Studies, Cornell University)

4:00 PM: 

Lynda Klich (Visiting Assistant Professor, Hunter College, CUNY),

"Estridentismo, Mexican Modernity and the Popular"

 

5:00 PM: KEYNOTE ADDRESS:

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer (Artist, Mexico),

"Platforms for Alien Participation"

 

RECEPTION

 

Saturday May 14, 2011

9:00 AM:

Daniel R. Quiles (Assistant Professor, Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism, School of the Art Institute of Chicago),

"From Communication to Containment: Space and Technology in Argentine Art, 1966-1974"

 

10:00 AM:

Rodrigo Alonso (Art historian, Universidad de Buenos Aires; Curator representing Argentina at 2011 Venice Bienniale),

"Emancipating Realities: Art and Technology in Argentina around the Sixties"

 

11:00 AM: COFFEE BREAK

 

11:15 AM: FEATURED SPEAKER:

Rubén Gallo (Director, Program in Latin American Studies; Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Cultures, Princeton University),

"Notes Towards an Acoustic Modernity: Radio and Avant-Garde Practices in Mexico City"

 

12:15 PM: LUNCH

 

1:15 PM:

Simone Osthoff (Associate Professor, Critical Studies, School of Visual Arts, Pennsylvania State University),

"Beyond Syntax: Intersections of Poetry, Art, Design and Media in Brazil in the Late 1950s"

 

2:15 PM:

Martha Sesín (Independent scholar, US),

"Technology and Toys: Optical and Kinetic Art's Rise and Fall in Mid-Twentieth Century Paris"

 

3:15 PM: COFFEE BREAK

3:30 PM:

José-Carlos Mariátegui (Scientist and media theorist/researcher/curator, UK and Peru),

"How Media Art Becomes Social: A New Technological Culture in Latin America"

 

4:30 PM:

Karla Jasso (Art Historian; Chief Curator, Laboratorio Arte Alameda, Mexico),

"Cybernetics and Electronic Sculptures in Mexico: Two References for Contemporary Techno-Artistic Practices"

 

5:30 PM: CLOSING REMARKS:

Timothy Murray (Director, Society for the Humanities; Curator, The Rose Goldsen Archive of New Media Art, Cornell Library; Professor, Comparative Literature and English)

 

RECEPTION

Readings

RAFAEL LOZANO-HEMMER (Artist, Mexico) 
"Platforms for Alien Participation."
>> SUGGESTED READING 1 (PDF will open in a new window)
>> SUGGESTED READING 2 (PDF will open in a new window)

RODRIGO ALONSO (Art historian, Universidad de Buenos Aires; Curator representing Argentina at 2011 Venice Bienniale), 
“Emancipating Realities: Art and Technology in Argentina around the Sixties.” 
>> SUGGESTED READING

RUBÉN GALLO (Director, Program in Latin American Studies; Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Cultures, Princeton University), 
“Notes Towards an Acoustic Modernity: Radio and Avant-Garde Practices in Mexico City.” 
>> SUGGESTED READING (internet link, will open in a new window)

LYNDA KLICH (Visiting Assistant Professor, Hunter College, CUNY), “Estridentismo, Mexican Modernity, and the Popular.” 
>> SUGGESTED READING (PDF will open in a new window)

JOSÉ-CARLOS MARIÁTEGUI (Scientist and media theorist/researcher/curator, UK, Peru), 
“How Media Art Becomes Social: A New Technological Culture in Latin America.” 
>> SUGGESTED READING 1 (PDF will open in a new window)
>> SUGGESTED READING 2 (PDF will open in a new window)

SIMONE OSTHOFF (Associate Professor, Critical Studies, School of Visual Arts, Pennsylvania State University), 
“Beyond Syntax: Intersections of Poetry, Art, Design and Media in Brazil in the Late 1950s.” 
>> SUGGESTED READING (PDF will open in a new window)

MARTHA SESÍN (Independent scholar, US), “Technology and Toys: Optical and Kinetic Art's Rise and Fall in Mid-Twentieth Century Paris.” 
>> SUGGESTED READING (PDF will open in a new window)

Sponsors

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY OF ART AND VISUAL STUDIES:

  

DEPARTMENT OF ART:

 

  

THE SOCIETY FOR THE HUMANITIES:

 

 

 

THE ROSE GOLDSEN LECTURE SERIES

 &

  

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM:

 

 

 

Contact

DIRECTIONS TO THE A.D. WHITE HOUSE


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MarÌa FernÁndez
Conference Organizer
Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies
History of Art and Visual Studies
mf252@cornell.edu
(607) 255-7050

Lisa Baker
Program Coordinator
Institute for Comparative Modernities
lkb52@cornell.edu

Mailing Address:
The Institute for Comparative Modernities
Cornell University
Toboggan Lodge
38 Forest Home Drive
Ithaca, NY 14853

Phone: 607.255.8073
Fax: 607.254.7244